• Sports Medicine

  • Elbow

  • Hip

  • Knee

  • Shoulder

  • Foot & Ankle

Foot & Ankle

Achilles Tendon Rupture

The Achilles tendon is a strong fibrous cord present behind the ankle that connects the calf muscles to the heel bone. It is used when you walk, run and jump. When the Achilles tendon becomes thin, weak, or if it is not used, it may be susceptible to injury or damage.

Find out more about Achilles Tendon Rupture, click on below tab

Ankle Sprains

Ankle Sprains are common injuries that occur from over stretching or tearing of the ligaments that support the ankle.

Find out more about Ankle Sprains, click on below tabs

Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is a long, thin ligament present along the bottom of the foot that creates the arch of the foot. It extends from the heel bone, and then splits and fans out to attach itself to the toes.

Find out more about Plantar Fasciitis, click on below tabs

Flatfoot

The plantar fascia is a long, thin ligament present along the bottom of the foot that creates the arch of the foot. It extends from the heel bone, and then splits and fans out to attach itself to the toes.

Find out more about Flatfoot, click on below tabs

Athlete's Foot

Flatfoot, also called fallen arches or Pes planus, is a deformity in children’s feet where the arch that runs lengthwise along the sole of the foot collapses to the ground or is not formed at all. Flatfoot is normal in the first few years of life as the arch of the foot usually develops between the age of 3 and 5 years.

Find out more about Athlete's Foot, click on below tab

Achilles Tendon Repair

Tendons are the soft tissues connecting muscle to bone. The Achilles tendon is the longest tendon in the body and is present behind the ankle, joining the calf muscles with the heel bone. Contraction of the calf muscles tightens the Achilles tendon and pulls the heel, enabling the foot and toe movements necessary for walking, running and jumping.

Find out more about Achilles Tendon Repair, click on below tabs

Ankle Arthroscopy

Ankle arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure in which an arthroscope, a small, soft, flexible tube with a light and video camera at the end, is inserted into the ankle joint to evaluate and treat a variety of conditions.

Find out more about Ankle Arthroscopy, click on below tabs

Ankle Fracture

The ankle joint is composed of three bones: the tibia, fibula, and talus which are articulated together. The ends of the fibula and tibia (lower leg bones) form the inner and outer malleolus, which are the bony protrusions of the ankle joint that you can feel and see on either side of the ankle.

Find out more about Ankle Fracture, click on below tabs

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Professional Affiliations

  • Arthroscopy Association Of North America
  • Keystone Surgery Center
  • American Association orthoscopic Section
  • American Medical Association
  • American College Of Sports Medicine
  • Lexington  Medical Society