• Sports Medicine

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Hip

Femoroacetabular Impingement

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion. The femoral head and acetabulum rub against each other creating damage and pain to the hip joint. The damage can occur to the articular cartilage (the smooth white surface of the ball or socket) or the labral tissue (the lining of the edge of the socket) during normal movement of the hip.

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Hip Fracture

The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint surface is covered by a smooth articular surface that allows pain free movement in the joint.

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Hip Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy, also referred to as keyhole or minimally invasive surgery, is a procedure in which an arthroscope is inserted into a joint to check for any damage and repair it simultaneously.

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Hip Dislocation

The hip joint is a ball and socket joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum. The joint is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons that support and hold the bones of the joint in place. Hip dislocation occurs when the head of the femur moves out of the socket. The femoral head can dislocate either backward (posterior dislocation) or forward (anterior dislocation).

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Hip Ligament Repair

The important ligaments of the hip include iliofemoral ligament, the pubofemoral ligament, and ischiofemoral ligaments. They provide support and stability to the hip. Torn ligaments of the hip can usually be treated through minimally invasive surgery with the use of an arthroscope and other specialized instruments to repair the ligaments. The time of surgery will depend on the severity and extent of the ligament rupture. You will usually be allowed to go home on the same day following the arthroscopic repair.

Click on the topics below to find out more from the Orthopedic connection website of American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

Professional Affiliations

  • Arthroscopy Association Of North America
  • Keystone Surgery Center
  • American Association orthoscopic Section
  • American Medical Association
  • American College Of Sports Medicine
  • Lexington  Medical Society